Human Rights: News/Stories

01
October 2020

“She has inspired countless young activists to speak up for a more just, inclusive, and free Viet Nam.” Ming Yu Hah, Deputy Regional Director for Campaigns, Amnesty International

By Amnesty International

7 October 2020

“Pham Doan Trang faces an imminent risk of torture and other-ill treatment at the hands of the Vietnamese authorities. She must be immediately and unconditionally released.”

By Reuters

7 October 2020

Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International condemned Tuesday’s arrest and demanded her immediate release.​

02
October 2020

Vietnam is a one-party state, dominated for decades by the ruling Communist Party of Vietnam (CPV). Although some independent candidates are technically allowed to run in legislative elections, most are banned in practice. Freedom of expression, religious freedom, and civil society activism are tightly restricted. The authorities have increasingly cracked down on citizens’ use of social media and the internet.

By Freedom House

18 May 2020

Vietnam is a one-party state, dominated for decades by the ruling Communist Party of Vietnam (CPV). Although some independent candidates are technically allowed to run in legislative elections, most are banned in practice. Freedom of expression, religious freedom, and civil society activism are tightly restricted. The authorities have increasingly cracked down on citizens’ use of social media and the internet.

By Freedom House

14 October 2020

Overview

Internet freedom declined to an all time low in Vietnam, as the government continued to impose stringent controls over the country’s online environment. In an effort to scrub any trace of critical or “toxic” speech online, the state continued mandating companies to remove content, suspended online newspapers, and imposed draconian criminal sentences for online expression. A deliberate disruption to connectivity amid a violent land dispute, as well as a reported throttling of Facebook’s local servers by state-owned telecommunications companies, further constrained internet freedom.

03
October 2020

Human Rights Watch's reports

Vietnam did little to improve its abysmal human rights record in 2019. The government continues to restrict all basic civil and political rights, including freedom of expression, association, assembly, and the rights to freely practice beliefs and religion. It prohibits the formation and operation of any organization or group deemed threatening to the Communist Party’s monopoly of power.

By Human Rights Watch

19 June 2020

(New York) – The Vietnamese government is intensifying a crackdown on human rights activists and dissidents ahead of the Communist Party of Vietnam’s 13th party congress scheduled for January 2021, Human Rights Watch said today. The authorities have arrested and convicted numerous people for political crimes between late 2019 and June 2020.

Authorities across the country have detained and charged members of the Independent Journalists Association, a member of the human rights group Brotherhood for Democracy, and several other independent writers and activists. Courts have also convicted several previously detained dissidents and sentenced them to significant prison time.

By Human Rights Watch

30 October 2020

(Tokyo) – The Japanese government should immediately cancel plans to provide financial assistance to Vietnam’s Ministry of Public Security, which has long been responsible for serious human rights violations, Human Rights Watch said today.

On October 19, 2020, Japan’s Foreign Ministry announced a 300 million yen (US$2.84 million) grant for the Public Security Ministry to purchase unspecified equipment for “counterterrorism” and the “maintenance of public order.” The Foreign Ministry claimed the grant would “contribute” to the “strengthening of counterterrorism measures and the maintenance of public order,” and would “stabilize society” in Vietnam.

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